Meritocracy Script Font
Meritocracy Script Font
Meritocracy Script Font
Meritocracy Script Font
Meritocracy Script Font
Meritocracy Script Font
Meritocracy Script Font
Meritocracy Script Font
Meritocracy Script Font
Meritocracy Script Font
Meritocracy Script Font
Meritocracy Script Font
Meritocracy Script Font
Meritocracy Script Font
Meritocracy Script Font
Meritocracy Script Font

Meritocracy Script Font

$29.00 Sale Save

Meritocracy is a full-featured handwritten font with tons of alternate characters and OpenType features. My goal with this font was to make you a typeface that will look as much like hand lettering as possible. Using the built-in OpenType pseudo-random contextual alternates and over 300 individually drawn ligatures, you can infuse your typography with personality and variety.

Try Meritocracy Before You Buy

Font size:

Letter spacing:

Line height:

Meritocracy: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

OpenType Features

Meritocracy includes the following OpenType features:

  • character variants
  • contextual alternates ** Special Meritocracy-specific Note: If you are using OpenType-capable software like Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, InDesign, or CorelDraw and you have contextual alternates turned on, you can see the letters randomize themselves as you type, mixing from the default character set and stylistic set 01. (You can always turn on contextual alternates after you have already typed your passage and it will randomize all at once, or you can choose to turn off contextual alternates and substitute specific glyphs yourself - I find that if I'm typing a word or two, I prefer to control the individual glyphs myself; if I'm typing a paragraph, I like to use the built-in randomness of the contextual alternates feature). See a little glimpse of this feature in action right here Note that this pseudo-randomization (aka contextual alternate feature) is ON by default in Apple's Pages app and OFF by default in Microsoft Word, but it can be turned on.
  • standard and discretionary ligatures
  • fractions
  • localized forms (multi-language and multi-currency support)
  • ordinals and superscripts
  • stylistic alternates
  • stylistic sets

The OpenType features can be very easily accessed by using OpenType-savvy programs (like most by Adobe, Corel, and Affinity). If you're using software that does not support OpenType features, your purchase download will include instructions and files that you can use with Character Map software in order to access all included characters.

Language Support

Support for English, Western European, and Eastern European Languages.

Includes support for US, Canadian, and Australian native languages and Mexican native languages EXCEPT Nahuatl.

If you need to know if this font supports a specific language, just ask.

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You've got "which license do I need" questions. I've got answers.

Below, I've listed the most common uses I'm asked about and I explain which license you need. Common programs and apps are provided as examples to help guide you.

If you read this and still have questions, please reach out.


Q: I want to use a font in a program like Adobe Photoshop, Microsoft Word, or Corel Draw.

A:You’ll want a standard desktop license for that.


Q: I want to use a font for my logo.

A:You’ll want a standard desktop license for that. If you'd also like to use the font on your website (outside of using it in rasterized images), you'll also need a web license.


Q: I want to use a font with my vinyl cutting software (like Cricut Design Space, Silhouette Studio, or Mint Studio).

A: You need a standard desktop license for that. Note that you’ll want to use the files from the “PUA-Encoded” folder in your product download.


Q: I want to upload a font to a site like Canva, Adobe Live, PicMonkey, or GoDaddy Studio in order to use it to create graphics for my own personal or commercial products.

A: Believe it or not, you’ll just need a standard desktop license because these sites function like desktop applications.


Q: I want to use a font in a Canva template that I will offer for sale to my own customers.

A: You’ll need a Commercial Template license for this. One license per template you plan to sell.


Q: I want to use a font for STATIC IMAGES on my website.

A: You’ll create these in a desktop app or on a website that functions like a desktop app, so you’ll need a standard desktop license for this. If you want to use the same font for body text, titles, headings, etc., you’ll need an additional webfont license (these two licenses can be bundled for a discount).


Q: I want to use a font for body text, titles, and headings in a website that I control or own.

A: You’ll want the standard webfont license for this use.


Q: I want to use a font in a template that I will allow my own customers to customize using a site like Corjl or Templett.

A: For this, you’ll need our new Commercial Template license. One license per template you plan to sell.


Q: I want to use a font in a website template that I will sell to my own customers (think ShowIt, Wordpress, ThemeForest, Shopify Theme Store, etc.).

A: You’ll need a Commercial Template for this use. One license per template you plan to sell. Note that you CAN embed the fonts in your template, but you CANNOT distribute the font files with the template files; instead, you must provide links for the end user to purchase an appropriate license.


Q: I want to use a font in an eBook or eMagazine.

A: You’ll need an ePub license.


Q: I want to upload a font to a customer-facing server with the purpose of allowing my own customers to customize an array of products (think Minted, Shutterfly, Tiny Prints, etc.)

A: For this use, you’ll need a Commercial Server License.


Q: I want to sell products that my customers can customize themselves, but I’m not sure whether I need a Commercial Template license or a Commercial Server license.

A: This is a great question and if the following answer leaves you still unsure, please contact support@upupcreative.com and we can discuss your specific circumstance. In general, 1 - if you’re creating a template that will be distributed to your customers as files, you’ll want the Template version of the license; 2 - if you’re using the font in just one single customizable product, you’ll want the Template version; and 3 - if you’re using the font across multiple customizable products, you’ll want the Server version.


Q: I want to use a font in a mobile app.

A: You’ll need an App license.


Q: I want to use a font in digital ads or OOH/DOOH campaigns.

A: You’ll need to contact support@upupcreative.com with the specifics for your project because you’ll most likely need a custom license.


Q: I want to use a font in a documentary, movie, or TV show.

A: You’ll need to contact support@upupcreative.com with the specifics for your project because you’ll most likely need a custom license.


Q: I am interested in an unlimited license.

A: You’ll need to contact support@upupcreative.com with the specifics for your project because you’ll most likely need a custom license.

 

Bonus Questions:

 

Q: Why do I need a license in the first place?

A: Believe it or not, fonts are software. Software lovingly and painstaking drawn, coded, and perfected over hundreds or even thousands of hours. Because of this, fonts are subject to intellectual property protection. Basically, you can't use a font without being granted permission. Buying a license grants you that permission.


Q: Okay, but why so many different types of licenses?

A: Surely, an unlimited license would be simplest. It would allow you to use a font in every possible scenario, everywhere on earth, in perpetuity. But the number of people who actually NEED that kind of license is very, very small and that license would be very, very expensive.

The separate license types help ensure that you're not paying for usage rights that you don't need. They keep fonts affordable while still allowing font designers to be compensated appropriately for their time, their ideas, their effort, and their expertise.

Still have questions or need a custom license?

UP UP CREATIVE IS AN INDEPENDENT TYPE FOUNDRY

I spend my days drawing letters and ligatures, obsessing over negative space and proportions. I believe type is the backbone of design, so I design fonts that work hard and look beautiful.